The hypocrisy of political correctness

The hypocrisy of political correctness. The City removed the tableau on the other side of this monument* in San Francisco’s civic center that depicted a Native California Indian in a subservient pose with two Spanish figures (missionary, vaquero). And yet this statue remains depicting the miners who flocked to California after news of the discovery of gold in 1848 at Sutter’s mill first spread to Yerba Buena (the Spanish pueblo that would become San Francisco) then nationwide. The Forty-Niners (depicted below) on the whole were a catastrophe for California Indians, much more so than the Spanish and subsequently Mexicans had been. The Forty-Niners carried out what can only be called genocide on the Native peoples.

Forty-Niner statue in SF Civic Center

WHY NOT TELL THE HISTORY INSTEAD OF HIDING IT AWAY?

*known as Pioneer Monument, located on Fulton between Larkin and Hyde.

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2 thoughts on “The hypocrisy of political correctness”

  1. Eric, have you ever explored any of the history of the Round Valley Indian Reservation and the various peoples who were interned there? Created in 1856 iirc in some form of “humane” response to the atrocities of which you speak. Descendants of these peoples are still there having found ways to co-exist with each other despite the disparity of the various Native cultures that were herded in there higgledy-piggledly, with none of them living on their ancestral grounds.

    This is where we plonked ourselves down (unbeknownest) to be on The Land in late 1967. Bill Buck’s Digger legacy.

    Claude

    >

    1. Coincidentally, Claude, here’s a quote I just came across in my current researches. This is from a Franciscan missionary writing back to the Collegio de San Fernando in Mexico in 1820: “The Indian population is declining. They live well free but as soon as we reduce them to a Christian and community life they decline in health, they fatten, sicken and die.” (Archibald, Robert R. The Economic Aspects of the California Missions. Washington, D.C.: Acad. of American Franciscan History, 1978.)

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